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Trailfest 2017: Alabama Events

Trailfest 2017 events in Alabama are made possible by major grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state agency of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Alabama State Council on the Arts - click to visit their website                                National Endowment for the Humanities

The National Endowment for the Arts                South Arts


 

Albert Murray
A CELEBRATION OF HUDSON STRODE AND THE ELEVENTH HOUSE


Demopolis
Thursday, May 18 5:30 p.m.
Gaineswood
805 South Cedar Street

Demopolis native Hudson Strode (1892-1976) became an acclaimed Southern historian and a literary legend at The University of Alabama. Dr. Don Noble, Emmy-winning host of Alabama Public Television's popular "Bookmark" and Strode's hometown celebrate the re-publishing of Strode's memoir The Eleventh House. Dr. Noble will discuss the influence which Demopolis had on Strode. The celebration begins with a champagne tea at 5:30. Book sales and a book signing will be held after Dr. Noble's talk. The program will be held at historic Gaineswood, the family home of Gaius Whitfield, who coincidentally was a "gentleman caller" of Edwina Dakin of Columbus, Mississippi. Edwina Dakin would later marry Cornelius Williams and have a son, Thomas Lanier. Tom Williams would become known to the world as playwright "Tennessee" Williams. The event is free. For further information, go to www.gaineswood.org " or call 334-289-4846.

 
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Albert Murray
THE SLAVE DWELLING PROJECT EXHIBITION, RECEPTION, AND OPENING PROGRAM


Demopolis
May 24-25, 2017
Marengo County History & Archives Museum at Rosenbush Building
101 North Walnut

The Marengo County History & Archives Museum and The Demopolis Public Library present Joseph McGill and the Slave Dwelling Project. The Slave Dwelling Project seeks to preserve and tell the stories of slave dwellings throughout America. A reception commemorating the project will be held at the Marengo County History & Archives Museum at Rosenbush Building (101 North Walnut) on Wednesday, May 24 at 6:00. That night, an opportunity to take part in a sleepover in Magnolia Grove's slave cabin in nearby Greensboro is available. The following evening, May 25 at 6:00, Joseph McGill leads an opening program for the "Changing America" exhibition, which focuses on the Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington.

"Changing America" is presented by the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of American History in collaboration with the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The tour of the exhibition is made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities Exploring the Human Endeavor. For further information, contact Mary Jones-Fitts at 334-341-3439 or marengomuseum@yahoo.com.

 
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Albert MurrayA Tribute to Albert Murray

Mobile
Thursday, May 4, 6:30 p.m.
Bernheim Hall at the Ben May Main Library, 701 Government Street

Paul Devlin, Murray scholar and long-time friend, will discuss the life and writing of Mobile native and 2015 inaugural Alabama Writers Hall of Fame inductee, Albert Murray. Devlin accepted the Alabama Writers' Hall of Fame medal for Murray, who died in 2013. Following the presentation, Jeanie Thompson, executive director of the Alabama Writers' Forum, a partnership program of the Alabama State Council on the Arts, and co-director of the Alabama Writers' Hall of Fame, will moderate a public discussion with Devlin.

Following the presentation, people are invited to gather in the Armbrecht/Briskman Meeting Room for cake and punch in celebration of Mr. Murray's 101th birthday coming up May 12. Admission is free. For more information, please call 251 208-7097.

Paul Devlin is co-editor (with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.) of the Library of America's definitive edition of Albert Murray's work. Volume one, non-fiction and memoirs, was published in October 2016. Volume two, fiction and poetry, will be published in 2018.

Devlin edited a collection of Murray's previously uncollected and unpublished interviews and music writings, Murray Talks Music: Albert Murray on Blues and Jazz (University of Minnesota Press, 2016), and Rifftide: The Life and Opinions of Papa Jo Jones as told to Albert Murray (Minnesota, 2011), a finalist for the Jazz Journalists Association's book award. Devlin's writing has appeared in many publications, including newspapers, magazines, and scholarly journals. He teaches at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York.

The program is a collaboration among the Mobile Public Library, the Alabama Writers' Hall of Fame, and the Southern Literary Trail, and is funded by Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mobile Public Library, and the Alabama Writers' Forum, a partnership program of the Alabama State Council on the Arts.

 
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Monroeville Building20th ANNUAL ALABAMA WRITERS SYMPOSIUM

Monroeville, Alabama
April 20-21

The town which both Harper Lee and Truman Capote called home plays host to the 20th annual Alabama Writers Symposium. Activities include art exhibits, music, book sales, book signings, and great food! Presentation of the Harper Lee Award for Alabama's Distinguished Writer and the Eugene Current-Garcia Award for Alabama's Distinguished Literary Scholar will be awarded through a generous grant from George F. Landegger. The Alabama Writers Symposium is a project of the Alabama Center for Literary Arts and is sponsored by Coastal Alabama Community College. To register go here. For further information, go here.








 
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Ralph Voss, Tennessee Williams ScholarTHE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DANCE PRESENTS

A DISCUSSION WITH TENNESSEE WILLIAMS SCHOLAR RALPH VOSS FOLLOWING THE PERFORMANCE OF "ECCENTRICITIES OF A NIGHTINGALE"

Allen Bales Theatre
The University of Alabama
February 24 - Performance begins at 7:30

Nationally recognized Tennessee Williams scholar Ralph Voss discusses the personal and regional influences that the Columbus, Mississippi-born playwright included in Eccentricities of a Nightingale, a revision of Summer and Smoke. The discussion is free. The author of books about Tennessee Williams, William Inge and Truman Capote, Dr. Voss is Professor Emeritus of English at UA. For more information, call 205-348-9950.








 
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THE FITZGERALD MUSEUM PRESENTS "FITZFILM"SLT Last Tycoon


The Capri Theatre
March 2 5:30 -8:30
Montgomery

'The Last Tycoon', a screenplay adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's final, unfinished novel will be presented at the Capri Theatre. The background of the film is set in Hollywood in the 'Golden Thirties' and follows a young productive chief, Monroe Stahr (based on Irving Thalberg). The original novel was edited by Edmund Wilson (Bunny), Fitzgerald's longtime friend and confidant. Much like the novel, the film flows without a conventional narrative, considering the final piece was still a fragment before 'Bunny' edited it. Tickets are $15.00 and can be purchased through PayPal or in person at The Fitzgerald Museum. Members please contact the museum regarding tickets: 334.264.4222.



 
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Carson Mcculler CelebrationThe mobile public library presents


CARSON MCCULLERS: A CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION
Bernheim Hall at the Ben May Main Library, 701 Government Street
March 5 2:00 p.m.
Mobile

To mark the centennial of the birth of author/playwright Carson McCullers, the Mobile Public Library presents "It's Good Weather for Fudge" by former Alabama poet laureate Sue Brannan Walker. Walker offers a biographical portrait of McCullers in a long-form poem rich in allusions to the writer's published works. Dr. Walker imagines a conversation with McCullers, in which they share memories about growing up in the Deep South - McCullers in Georgia and Walker in South Alabama. Dr. Sue Walker, is a Professor Emerita at the University of South Alabama and Poet Laureate of Alabama from 2003-2012. For more information, please call 251.208.7097. Light refreshments and book signing will be held in the Armbrecht/Biskman Meeting Room following the presentation.





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The mobile public Library PresentsSLT March


A WORLD WAR I HERO AND AUTHOR: A SPECIAL SCREENING OF ROBERT CLEM'S NEW FILM "THE TWO WORLDS OF WILLIAM MARCH"
Ben May Main Library, 701 Government Street
April 6 7:00 p.m.
Mobile

In celebration of the centennial of America's entry into World War I, the Mobile Public Library welcomes filmmaker Robert Clem for a special preview screening of his new film, The Two Worlds of William March. William Campbell March won three decorations for bravery in World War I and acquired fame as the author of Company K and The Bad Seed. The film tells the story of William Edward Campbell (1893-1954), a native of Mobile who spent his childhood in the dismal lumber camps of wiregrass Alabama before joining the U.S. Marines in 1917 where he saw intense combat in France, winning the Army and Navy Crosses and the French Croix de Guerre for his bravery in combat.

After the war, William Campbell joined the fledgling Waterman Steamship Corporation and found his fortune as a business executive but also lived a second life as the eccentric and secretive writer, William March. March's 1933 novel, Company K is considered the finest American book about the war, and the most realistic. He set many short stories and three novels in the fictional South Alabama town of Reedyville, writing with the same harsh realism as he did about war. His final and most famous work was The Bad Seed, set in Mobile about an eight-year-old child who commits multiple murders. It was his final, ironic statement on the human capacity for evil, which he had seen firsthand in war.

The film includes dramatization, as well as interviews with literary voices and people who knew William Campbell before his death in 1954. Since March left no memoir and kept his personal life a secret, the film relies on the work of biographer Roy Simmonds and recreates his interviews with March's psychoanalyst Edward Glover, art dealer Klaus Perls and friends such as Kay Boyle and Clay Shaw. The film includes excerpts from Robert Clem's 2004 adaptation of Company K; a clip from the trailer for The Bad Seed; and short scenes from March's most autobiographical stories, This Heavy Load, Happy Jack, and The Shoe Drummer.

The project is a collaboration between the Mobile Public Library and the Foundation for New Media and has been funded by the Ben May Charitable Trust; A.S. Mitchell Foundation; Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities; Daniel Foundation of Alabama; and Monte Moorer Foundation.



 
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